D-Eye attaches to your smartphone to help you avoid seeing the eye doctor

June 15, 2015
IE

Those who live in remote parts of countries don’t find it easy to get to see an eye doctor the same as those who live close to a town. However a new device called D-Eye could be a solution for them and it could change people’s lives. Around 80% of visual impairments suffered by people around the world could be cured or prevented in the first place simply by having an examination of the eyes and care of them.

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[Image Source: D-eyecare]

The D-Eye is a lens for a smartphone that clips easily onto the back of the camera and at the moment the technology works with the iPhone 5, 5S, 6 and the Samsung Galaxy S4 and Galaxy S5. The lens is very easy to put into place and it doesn’t need power in order for it to run. It has an app that allows patients to film their own examination of their eye and this can then be sent to a specialist over the internet for them to check.

Devices

[Image Source: D-eyecare]

The tech comes with an innovative mounting bumper, retinal imaging system and eye lens. It means that people can carry around their own technology in their pocket and undertake an eye test along with retinal screening to look for many disorders. People will be able to test for glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration associated with age or diabetic retinopathy.

D-Eye was developed by Andrea Russo, an ophthalmologist, who has worked alongside Si14 SpA, a tech development company from Italy. The patient establishes a link with the doctor over the internet and the doctor can then remotely control the phone to look into the eye along with being able to review the patient’s files. The technology offers a comprehensive view of all regions of the eye relying on combinations of levers and beam splitters created by the LED flash, camera and the autofocus of the phone. The lens is being offered for 400 Euros and the bumper attachment an additional 40 Euros and the app is free. A cloud service is also being planned for using with the tech and storing scans