Everyone wants superpowers and I’m sure some of you may have wished for Moses’ ability to part water and cross to the other side, but you thought it was impossible huh? That is unless you fancy taking a stroll over the Moses Bridge in the Netherlands.

RO-AD-West-Brabant-Waterline6[Image Courtesy of RO&AD Architecten]

In the 17th century a series of fortresses and moats were built stretching out over the West Branbant Water Line. These were built to provide the residents with protection when Spain and France were invading. One of these, Fort de Roovere had a shallow moat that surrounded it that was too deep to be marched across but was too shallow for boats to float on. It has been protected until the Moses Bridge was designed by Ro Koster and Ad Kil, two architects.

RO-AD-West-Brabant-Waterline4[Image Courtesy of RO&AD Architecten]

They built the bridge through the moat and from a distance it cannot be seen as it looks as though the water continues flowing down the moat when looking at eye level. It isn’t until you get right up to the bridge that you can actually see just how unique it is as it sits on and in the water, with the level of the water in the moat rising right up to the top of the sides of the sunken bridge.

However the water never overflows onto the bridge, making it inaccessible. This is down to the fact that there are two dams at each end of the moat and these manage to keep the level of the water at the correct level. If it rains there is a pump at the bridges bottom which gets rid of the excess water.

RO-AD-West-Brabant-Waterline7[Image Courtesy of RO&AD Architecten]

The bridge lies flush with the earth that surrounds it on the slopes, being lined with wood sheet piling that make up the walls along with the stairs and the deck. The bridges sides have been made from  accoya, which is a hardwood, typically used in decking on bridges. This wood has been given an non-toxic modification process and it is this that stops it from becoming a victim to fungal decay.

RO-AD-West-Brabant-Waterline5[Image Courtesy of RO&AD Architecten]

The bridges walls are what part the water in this case and are what allow people to walk across the water without getting their feet wet. The Moses Bridge offers a unique chance to pass through water that has been parted and at the end enjoy seeing a historic fortress, packed with history.

RO-AD-West-Brabant-Waterline3[Image Courtesy of RO&AD Architecten]

Via [Inhabitat, RO&AD Architecten]