10 Awesome Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Your Beloved Lego Bricks

Lego has built the childhoods of many children, helping them bring to fruition their ideas. What do you know about Lego?

You are sure to have had a Lego experience at some point during your childhood, or maybe even recently as an adult. Those small little colorful plastic bricks have helped tons of small children take those imaginative ideas from the back of their minds and manifest them onto the floors of their bedrooms. If you ever played with Lego bricks, you are sure to have loved them. But, how much do you know about your childhood bricks? 

Build the World In Your Image

Without giving you too long of a history lesson, the LEGO group was founded in 1932 by Ole Kirk Kristiansen. What started off as a humble toy company has manifested itself into one of the most famous and beloved toy manufactures in the world. "Inspiring and developing the builders of tomorrow," the company has transcended toys to become the perfect tool for anyone looking to create and play. From grandeur monuments to your latest take on a car, there is nothing you cannot create with a couple of Legos. 

If you are a Lego master or simply curious about the plastic brick, here are some facts about the beloved bricks. 

1. Lego Makes More Tires Than Goodyear 

Though it might seem like a silly myth, this here is fact. On average LEGO produces a whopping 318 million tires a year, making that approximately 870,000 mini tires a day.  The Lego company produces these tires 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 

10 Awesome Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Your Beloved Lego Bricks
Source: Lego

2. You Can Pitch Your Own Lego Set 

For those part of the Lego community interested in creating their own Lego set, if you share your idea on their page and your idea gets 10,000 likes you the company will give you the possibility of bringing it to toy shelves. 

10 Awesome Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Your Beloved Lego Bricks
Source: Lego

3. The Lego Minifigures Are Yellow For a Reason

When the Lego Minifigure was introduced in 1975, the company wanted the builders to project their imaginations onto faceless figures. Yellow was believed to be a racially-neutral color.  

10 Awesome Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Your Beloved Lego Bricks
Source: Lego

4. Artists Love Using Lego bricks

As you probably already know, Lego bricks are not just for adults. Countless artists, sculptors, and painters have incorporated Lego into their pieces creating imaginative and playful pieces.   

5. Lego bricks from 1958 Can Still 'Connect'

If you found a Lego piece from the 1950's still laying around it would be able to connect with a Lego from 2018. Lego bricks are part of a universal system, meaning no matter when they are made the pieces will always be compatible.

6. The Biggest and Most Expensive Lego Set

This highly sought after Ultimate Collectors Series Millennium Falcon set contains over 7,541 pieces and costs $800. It might take you a few days to build this set. 

7. There is a House Entirely Made Of Lego bricks 

You ever dream of building your home out Lego bricks, well, someone has and then decided to do it. Using more than three million bricks Top Gear host James May and the BBC built a mostly functional home. 

8. The World's Highest Lego Tower Contains Over 500,000 Bricks 

A team of ambitious builders decided to build a 112-foot tower out of Lego bricks. The summer-long project landed them in the Guinness Book of World Records.

10 Awesome Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Your Beloved Lego Bricks
Source: Delaware Way

9. Numbers Inside Each Lego Brick Tell a Story

Lego bricks are expensive to make. The number on the underside of your bricks correspond to pricing mold that was used to form the brick before it was placed in packaging. If there are any defects, Lego can trace the issue back to its origins 

10. This Kid Created a Braille Printer With His Lego Set

Shubham Banerjee used the Lego Mindstorms set to create a fully operational Braille printer for the blind.    

Via: Lego