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10 of the Worst but Most Creative Fixes Ever

If you think you suck at DIY, these 10 awful yet creative fixes might make you feel better.

10 of the Worst but Most Creative Fixes Ever
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There really are times when you should consider getting a professional to help you fix something. Though not always!

But, as you are about to find out, sometimes its more fun to find creative solutions yourself. We really do despair at times.

As we have already seen, there are some things that homeowners can probably tackle themselves relatively easily. But there are many situations where it could be considered a false economy not to hire a professional.

For example, structural issues or anything related to gas or electricity should really be tackled by trained professionals. These issues are potentially very dangerous and need to be cured properly.

When it comes to home appliances like washing machines, televisions, etc, if still under warranty, it is always best to seek professional help to cure any issue.

By not doing so, you not only run the risk of damaging the appliance but also, usually, will void any warranty that comes with it.

But, generally speaking, hiring a professional will actually save you time and, usually money too. When you hire a professional you are effectively renting their experience. 

They should have a wealth of knowledge of common problems and solutions to issues within their profession. In the long run, they will be able to cure the issue much more quickly, effectively, and safely, than you could as a layman.

RELATED: TOP 20 OF THE BEST ENGINEERING FIXES

What are some examples of the worst creative fixes?

So, without further ado, here are some examples of the worst creative fixes we've ever seen. Trust us when we say this list is far from exhaustive.

It is also in no particular order, though any one of them could be considered "the worst."

1. Yeah, good enough!

Skrelp (at a local Fred Meyer) from r/thereifixedit

We'll kick off our list with this particularly poor example of a simple fix to a problem. Either someone messed up when ordering the letters, or one has since been lost.

Either way, this "fix" is less than perfect. Surely it couldn't be that difficult to source a replacement "N" in the same font type and size?

Or, if all else fails, just try painting one? Whatever -- good enough.

2. Clearly, these chaps are not environmentalists!

No one will notice if I just... from r/thereifixedit

It appears these chaps have little no real concern for the environment. Their solution to clearing a build-up of rubbish from the upstream side of this bridge is to simply pick it up and dump it on the other side!

While an effective solution, they could have done their part for keeping the river clean by depositing it into a skip for proper disposal! Oh well, no-one will ever notice we suppose.

3. Duct tape fixes all problems

Duck tape fixes everything, right? from r/thereifixedit

While duct tape is an engineer's best friend, there are some types when you should really fix something properly. Take this chap's car for example. 

Although we admire their creative use of duct tape, this can't be considered a permanent solution surely? Oh well, it's not our problem. 

4. What's the problem mate?

You want the wire to go where? from r/thereifixedit

Here is an interesting example of amateur wiring. After mounting this CCTV camera before properly planning the wiring route, this workman found a creative way to "fix" the problem. 

While it most certainly works, it is not the most aesthetically pleasing finish to the job. If it works what's the problem, right?

5. Seriously? Who's idea was this?

No more gardenpuddle from r/thereifixedit

Here is another example of one of the worst, sort of awesome, fixes we've seen to date. After having some issues with drainage, this DIY-er, or sloppy pro, found an interesting solution.

Instead of finding a proper solution, they decided to simply divert their drain water somewhere else. Out of sight out of mind are we right? 

6. No need for a professional, I've got this!

Ordered takeout from a local Thai restaurant. from r/thereifixedit

When the AC broke at this Thai restaurant, instead of getting some engineers out, they decided to sort the problem in-house. With the creative use of an electric fan and stepladders, their DIY-fix is actually quite impressive.

While not the most attractive looking setup, if it works who cares? It seems this restaurant has its own MacGyver in its ranks. 

7. Tin cans make fantastic structural supports, apparently

Structural spaghetti cans from r/thereifixedit

At this supermarket, some members of staff found an interesting solution to some broken shelf struts. Instead of finding "proper" replacements, they discovered the secret of tin can structural engineering. 

While not the prettiest solution, it appears to work just fine. Kudos we suppose. 

8. Just stick a band-aid on it, it'll be fine!

Found the source of water leak in my basement after removing the insulation. An 8 foot floor to ceiling crack in the foundation. I fixed it though. 🤞 from r/thereifixedit

While band-aids are fantastic at helping to speed up cuts and scratches, they are not known for the tensile strength. However, after finding the problem to a leak in their basement, this DIY-er believes they have found the perfect solution. 

By applying a band-aid to crack in their wall, this creative repair should easily solve the problem! 

What could possibly go wrong? 

9. Not my job mate...

There's how they fixed my school's canteen doorknob from r/thereifixedit

Here is an interesting fix to a broken canteen door handle. After taking the time to order the right replacement part, this workman appears to not really care about aesthetics.

What's worse is that the other door's handle is right there! Couldn't they have just copied it?

Unless this is a prank, of course. 

10. Oh dear god!

Im sure it’s fine from r/thereifixedit

And finally, we present this interesting "fix" to a column on the verge of collapse. Instead of getting some professionals in to rectify the issue, someone thought that a copious amount of sellotape should do the trick. 

Problem solved, right? What could possibly go wrong? 

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