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2019 is Officially World’s Second-Hottest Year On Record

The EU's climate monitoring service Copernicus announced the record and the alarm bells are ringing.

2019 is Officially World’s Second-Hottest Year On Record
Global heatmapStrava

The European Union’s climate monitoring service, Copernicus Climate Change Service, has officially confirmed what everyone was expecting: 2019 was officially the second-hottest year ever recorded.

While this revelation might not shock anybody, hearing it like this might get your alarm bells ringing: 19 of the last 20 years are now the warmest on record.

Copernicus announced the record on Wednesday morning and the data shows that December 2019 tied with 2015 for the warmest December to be ever recorded in history.

SEE ALSO: AUSTRALIA BUSHFIRES ARE GENERATING THUNDERSTORMS THAT CAN START MORE FIRES

Throughout the year, the world battled with high temperatures all around: all-time high temperatures were seen in countries such as Belgium, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. By July, it was already clear that 2019 would be one of the warmest years since 2015 since the first half of the year was the second-warmest half-year on record.

Moreover, Copernicus also stated that the atmospheric carbon concentrations continued to rise in 2019, again, reaching their highest level on record. 

These are undoubtedly alarming signs that are needed to be taken seriously.

People like to point out that cold or low records were also broken in 2019 and this kind of data is misleading. This is partly true: winter still arrives and daily weather will always fluctuate. However, the critical point is high-temperature records are crushing the low-temperature records now. In mid-December, 364 all-time high temperatures were set in 2019, but the all-time lows were just 70. This is the important part. 

If we called 2019 the flaming cherry on top we wouldn’t be wrong, it ended the hottest decade in history. Moreover, the end of the decade has brought climate-related disasters such as fires scorching Australia and flooding killing dozens of people in Indonesia.

Our world is getting hotter and it's impossible not to feel it. While 2019 was a significant year for climate change, scientific data show that drastic measures are needed to be taken immediately.

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