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27-Year-Old 'Oldest' Baby Is Almost as Old as Her Mom

The wee girl came from a frozen embryo.

A little baby girl in Tennessee, the U.S. was born in October and potentially claimed the title of the world's oldest baby ever born. She is believed to be the longest frozen embryo to be born successfully in a live birth — after 27 years in a deep freeze. 

Molly Gibson's embryo was frozen in October 1992, and she joined Tina and Ben Gibson's family in 2020. In an interesting twist of fate, Molly's mom, Tina who is 29, was born just 18 months before her. 

To make matters even more interesting, Molly's sister, Emma, is in fact her biological sister, having come from the same biological mother and having her embryo frozen, 24.5 years ago. She is now also part of the Gibson family and was born in 2017. 

Science, eh?

SEE ALSO: U.S. WOMAN SECOND PERSON TO GIVE BIRTH TO A TRANSPLANTED UTERIUS FROM A DEAD DONOR

"It's hard to wrap your head around it," Tina Gibson told the New York Post. "But, as far as we're concerned, Molly is our little miracle."

The Gibson family had previously struggled to start a family of their own. Tina and Ben Gibson have been married for 10 years, and had been trying to have children for five years.

They decided to adopt Molly and Emma's embryos from the National Embryo Donation Center (NEDC), which so happens to be located nearby the Gibsons, after Tina's parents saw a story on the local news station.

Having two girls they can call their own has made the family incredibly happy. "We're over the moon," Tina Gibson said to the BBC. "I still get choked up."

"If you would have asked me five years ago if I would have not just one girl, but two, I would have said you were crazy," she continued.

The NEDC has been in operation since 2003 and is a non-profit embryo donation program in Knoxville, Tennessee. The non-profit has facilitied over 1,000 embryo adoptions and births. Similar to traditional adoptions, couples have the choice to choose "open" or "closed" embryo adoption, meaning they can choose if they have contact with the donor family or not. 

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