7 Underground Wonders of the World Lost Caverns and Buried Cities

These 7 underground wonders are definitely worth a visit if you are ever in the area.

Around the world are countless underground wonders of the world that are just waiting to be explored. Many have been discovered and we have included some of the best here for your perusal. 

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What are the underground wonders of the world?

Around the world are many cave systems, human constructions and other structures that are so breathtaking it is hard to believe they actually exist. 

Here are just some of the many underground wonders of the world, according to unbelievable-facts.com: -

  • Reed Flute Cave, China. 
  • Škocjan Caves, Slovenia. 
  • Magma Chamber of Thrihnukagigur Volcano, Iceland.
  • Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor, China. 
  • Poço Encantado, Brazil. 
  • Puerto Princesa Underground River, Philippines.

What are the 7 Wonders of the World?

The traditional 7 wonders of the world are as follows: -

  • Great Pyramid of Giza. 
  • Temple of Artemis at Ephesus (since lost). 
  • Hanging Gardens of Babylon (since lost). 
  • Lighthouse of Alexandria (since lost). 
  • Statue of Zeus at Olympia (since lost). 
  • Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (since lost). 
  • Colossus of Rhodes (since lost). 

What are the 8 Wonders of the World in 2018?

Many of the original constructions that tend to feature in the ancient wonders of the world list have long since disappeared today. What we know of them is from historical texts and imagery from archaeological evidence. 

Because of this, many believe it more appropriate to formulate a list of extant buildings and sites to form such a list. Because of this, since 2001, an initiative was launched by the Swiss Corporation New7Wonders Foundation to choose 7 new ones. 

The results of their online poles are as follows: -

  • The Great Wall of China, China.
  • Petra, Jordan.
  • Christ the Redeemer, Brazil.
  • Machu Pichu, Peru.
  • Chichen Itza, Mexico.
  • The Colosseum (more correctly The Flavian Amphitheater) of Rome, Italy.
  • Taj Mahal, India.

7 awesome underground wonders

Here are some of the many amazing underground wonders from around the world. This list is clearly not exhaustive and is in no particular order.

1. The Catacombs, Paris

underground wonders paris
Source: Les Catacombes de Paris

The Catacombs of ParisLes Catacombes de Paris, is a large underground labyrinth of tunnels under the streets of Paris. This is impressive enough, but its standout feature is the enormous collection of human skulls and bones that adorn its walls. 

Archaeological investigations indicate that the tunnels have existed since at least Roman times and are thought to stretch for about 322 km. It is estimated that a total of 6 to 7 million former Parisians are buried there, and many areas are off-limits to the public. 

2. Dan yr Ogaf Caves, Wales, UK

undeground wonders dan yr ogaf
Source: National Showcaves Centre for Wales

Dan yr Ogaf (Dan-ear-oar-goff), located at the National Showcaves Centre for Wales in the UK, is another amazing, once lost, underground wonder. This 17 km-long cave system is located about 24 km North of Ystradgynlais in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

The cave system's most striking feature is its enormous cavernous show-cave complex which is thought to be the largest of its kind in the UK. It is stunningly beautiful and, unsurprisingly, has become a major tourist attraction for the region. 

"The bones of some 42 humans, as well as numerous animal bones, have been found in one of the nearby chambers of this cave system. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, Dan yr Ogof was named as the greatest natural wonder in Britain." - Wikipedia. 

3. Derinkuyu, Cappadocia, Turkey

Derinkuyu (Der-in-koo-u) is a massive underground city in the Nevsehir Province of Turkey. It forms one of many similar complexes across the beautiful Cappadocian region of the country.

It extends, in places, to depths of 60 meters underground and is thought to have once housed at least 20,000 people at its height. It could also accommodate animals and had plentiful stores for foodstuffs. 

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It is believed that it was originally built during the 8th-7th centuries BC by the Phrygians. But it wasn't fully developed until the Byzantine Era as a safe haven from marauding Muslim invaders between the 8th and 12th Centuries AD. 

4. Turda Salt Mines, Romania

Salina Turdu is a large salt mine in the Durgău-Valea Sărată area of Turda, the second-largest city in Cluj CountyRomania. It has been open to the public since 1992 and receives well over 600,000 visitors a year. 

It is impressive to see and is ranked as one of the "25 Hidden Gems Around the World That Are worth a Trek" by Business Insider

It is one of the oldest in the world and has had various uses over time from a cheese center to a WW2 bomb shelter. 

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5. Cave of the Crystals, Mexico

underground wonders mexico
Source: Alexander Van Driessche/Wikimedia Commons

Deep below the city of Nacia, Chihuahua in Mexico is one of the most beautiful underground wonders in the world. This former volcanic magma chamber was only recently discovered in 2000 and houses some of the largest natural crystals ever found.

Most of the cave system remains unexplored and you will need to get permission before visiting the site in advance of a visit. However, it is definitely worth the hassle.

6. The West Norwood Cemetry Catacombs, London

The West Norwood Cemetry is "one of the first private landscaped cemeteries in London, it is one of the "Magnificent Seven" cemeteries of London, and is a site of major historical, architectural and ecological interest." - Wikipedia. 

Construction began in 1837 and consists of around 95 vaults and private and shared spaces that can hold up to 3,500 coffins. However, it has ceased being used since the 1930s.

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Since then some coffins have been moved, but many remain in situ

7. Yerebatan Sarnıcı, Istanbul, Turkey

Yerebatan Sarnıcı (Yer-e-bat-an-Sar-ner-jer), literally meaning "sinking into the ground  (water cistern)" in Turkish, is more commonly known in English as the Basilica Cistern. It is another magnificent underground wonder of the world and can be found 150 NW of the former Byzantine Basilica Hagia Sophia Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.

It is the largest and most complete of several hundred ancient Byzantine cisterns of the great city of Constantinople (now Istanbul). They were built sometime in the 6th Century AD under the rule of Byzantine Emperor Justinian the 1st. 

Today it is open to the public and is well worth a visit if you ever find yourself in Istanbul. 

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