A Violent Stalker Found a Japanese Artist's Home by Zooming in on Her Eyes

The obsessed fan was able to gather information from seemingly innocuous photos online.

A disturbed stalker in Japan was able to track down and assault a popular J-pop artist by zooming into her eyes in a social media photograph.

By zooming into the photo, he was able to piece together information, allowing him to pinpoint the singer's address.

RELATED: HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM BECOMING A VICTIM OF CYBERSTALKING

An online stalker

The obsessed fan, named as Hibiki Sato, 26, tracked down 21-year-old J-pop collective Tenshitsukinukeniyomi member, Ena Matsuoka, by using the information he gathered in the reflection of her eyes.

According to local news reports, Sato assaulted Matsuoka on September 1 in front of her home in Tokyo.

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Picture of Ena Matsuoka (left). Source: Twitter

As AsiaOne reports, the attacker tracked Matsuoka down, by matching the reflection of a bus stop in her eyes with its street using Google Maps.

Sato eventually admitted to the assault, after being arrested on September 17.

Details of the attack

According to The Next Web, Sato had been waiting at the bus stop he had pinpointed in the reflection of the singer's eyes, before approaching her from behind and covering her mouth with a piece of cloth.

According to reports, he then dragged her to a dark spot near the home, where he molested the singer. Ena Matsuoka's face was injured in the assault.

Sato later claimed to the police officers involved in the case that he was able to estimate the floor that the singer lived on, using Gooogle Street View and comparing it to the location in the social media photographs.

Dangers of smart device tech

As AsiaOne reports, Japan has recently revised its anti-stalking laws to cover online harassment after a string of attacks — the worst of which saw singer Mayu Tomita stabbed several times by a stalker.

Tomita tried to report her stalker 12 days before the attack occurred. However, the police dismissed her pleas.

These cases are a stark reminder of the dangers of the powerful smart devices we keep in our pockets.

Cameras are so advanced that tiny details can be found and used by malicious people capable of committing awful acts. 

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