Covid-19
Advertisement

Animation Shows How Bridges Were Built in 14th Century

Can you spot any engineering techniques that are still in use today?

If you've ever been lucky enough to visit Prague, the capital city of Czechia, then you must have definitely fallen in love with the Charles Bridge (Karlův most) which stands tall and proud, showing off its magnificent engineering 618 years after its completion. 

If you've ever wondered how Charles Bridge or other such bridges were built back in times where engineering hadn't reached its peaks, this video will provide immense insight into the construction process.

SEE ALSO: ENGINEERS UNVEIL NEW FUTURISTIC BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION METHOD, MODELED AFTER UMBRELLA

What makes Charles Bridge special

Before we dive into the technicalities, here is some history trivia for you. The iconic Charles Bridge's construction started in 1357 and was completed in 45 years.

It stands across the Vltava (Moldau) river and is 1,693 feet (616 meters) long and almost 33 feet (10 meters) wide. In addition to the three bridge towers, it is also decorated with 30 statues.

45 years of construction condensed into three minutes

The video, originally published in 2016 by YouTube channel Praha archeologickáand, is now making rounds on the internet again. The construction process of the Charles Bridge that took almost half a century has been condensed into 3 minutes, attracting more than 1.7M views in the process. 

The animation's beautiful 3D graphics were done by Tomáš Musílek. It provides tremendous insight into old technology and building processes. The technology they used to make this iconic bridge possible was creative and intelligent, proving how ingenious humans can be. 

You can watch the video below. Can you spot any engineering techniques that are still in use today?

Impressed? This video will probably make you feel more appreciative on your next evening stroll on the Charles Bridge. Thanks to the machines and tools we have today, things are a lot easier.

Advertisement
Follow Us on

Stay on top of the latest engineering news

Just enter your email and we’ll take care of the rest:

By subscribing, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Advertisement