Artist Reimagines Social Media Platforms as Analog Anime Technology

Artist Sheng Lam reimagines popular media companies in anime analog style.

Our modern lives are filled with media, from social media to video applications to audio programs, could we even survive if we didn't have some kind of media to capture our attention? While YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and the rest are all modern inventions from the tech era, these applications have been reimagined as retro technology – all in anime style. 

An artist by the name of Sheng Lam created concept drawings for nearly every popular media platform, imagining these services as old analog machinery.

What if your Instagram was just a sharable polaroid camera? What if sending a Tweet meant breaking out a telegraph machine? Keep reading and you'll get a better idea of what these redesigns would look like.

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Now, technically all of these concept drawings don't state which application they're for... but the artist makes it pretty clear. A red "YooTube" device or a purple "Phasebook" drawings aren't exactly the most inconspicuous of drawings. The drawings are pretty impressive and do an awesome job of redesigning what new technologies would look like if they existed many decades ago.

Check out the social media app redesigns below!

YouTube

YouTube
Source: Sheng Lam

This YooTube VCR makes me quite thankful that watching the latest Smarter Every Day or Mark Rober video doesn't take heading to the store, hoping they have the new VHS in-stock, and then trying to get it to play at home. Doing the math, there are 300 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute, which means that every minute there would be the equivalent of 60 VHS tapes created for YouTube content. I know where I'd be investing my money if this YooTube device was a reality... that's right, VHS tapes.

Facebook

Artist Reimagines Social Media Platforms as Analog Anime Technology
Source: Sheng Lam 

Phasebook seems like an appropriate mock name for the world's largest social media application. You'll be able to simply pop in a new floppy disc for each phase of your life, the Goth phase, the anime phase, the preppy phase. And thanks to how much storage floppy discs can pack inside of them, each one will fill up after just a few likes from your friends! 

Twitter

Twitter
Source: Sheng Lam

This twitter morse code machine is probably my favorite concept from Sheng. Imagine if every letter of every tweet mean that you had to tap out the code and send it to a central machine. Considering Twitter character limit, this is by far the most appropriate design for the social network. I also imagine that a morse code twitter would save us from that late-night drunk tweets too.

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Spotify

Spotify
Source: Sheng Lam

Potify, Spotify but for hipsters. This old cassette player concept of Spotify hits the nail on the head. It takes all of the convenience of a music streaming service and transforms it into one of the most impractical devices of all time. Not only would you need to lug around this giant cassette player, but you'd likely need a wagon filled with your favorite playlist cassettes just to stay entertained.

Instagram

Artist Reimagines Social Media Platforms as Analog Anime Technology
Source: Sheng Lam

Considering Instagram's old logo and even origins in square images, the Instogram camera actually seems like something that could come out in 2019. Imagine a camera that printed polaroids that also immediately uploaded the shot to your Instagram feed. It would probably sell millions.

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Netflix

Netflix
Source: Sheng Lam

Netflex, it weighs 50 pounds, makes a neat buzzing sound when you turn it on, and has the resolution of a potato. That said, the Netflex device actually might be the most appropriate to watch the latest season of Stranger Things on.

Which redesign was your favorite? You can check out more of Sheng Lam's social media app illustrations on his website and he even has prints available. 

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