Australian City Uses Drainage Nets to Stop Waste from Polluting Waterways

The simple and cost-effective solution is helping keep the town's water sources clean.

Pollution in our waterways is not only dangerous and unsanitary for humans but it also affects wildlife. That's why it is so exciting to see an initiative aimed at preventing such waste.

RELATED: THIS MODULAR ROBOTIC EEL CAN DETECT SOURCES OF WATER POLLUTION

The Australian city of Kwinana has designed a simple and cost-effective solution to deal with the discharge of waste from drainage systems. The town has put nets on the outlet of drainage pipes.

Australian City Uses Drainage Nets to Stop Waste from Polluting Waterways
Source: City of Kwinana

These nets stop waste and pollutants from leaving the sewers, preventing garbage transported by rain waters from contaminating the town's local water reserve. It is a simple filtering system and it works like a charm.

Australian City Uses Drainage Nets to Stop Waste from Polluting Waterways
Source: City of Kwinana

The city reported that in just six months it collected 370 kilograms (815 pounds) of garbage from two locations where the nets are installed. The collected debris is then separated and all recyclable materials are taken to a recycling center which processes biodegradable waste and turns it into fertilizer.

Australian City Uses Drainage Nets to Stop Waste from Polluting Waterways
Source: City of Kwinana

The city also pointed out that the nets were installed on 750mm and 450mm-diameter concrete drainage pipe outlets. In six months, they have been cleaned a total of three times and at no point has any animal been found trapped inside.

Australian City Uses Drainage Nets to Stop Waste from Polluting Waterways
Source: City of Kwinana

Carol Adams, the city mayor, revealed to SurferToday that the initiative only cost around $20,000.

"After seeing the nets in action in other local government areas, the City determined the net to be the most cost-effective and safest option over other methods which can be up to four times the cost per unit and are sealed and submerged structures," said Adams.

News of the nets made it on to social media where they were reported on by all kinds of media outlets. Hopefully, other cities will be inspired to take similar action.

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