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Bass Pro Shop Embroiled in Lawsuit Over Alligator Meat Purchases

Bass Pro Shop is facing a lawsuit for not buying enough alligator meat. We're not kidding.

Bass Pro Shops are facing a lawsuit from a Louisiana seafood company — claiming the outdoor retailer didn't purchase enough alligator meat, according to a local report from Springfield in the state of Missouri.

RELATED: TESLA FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST RIVIAN FOR STEALING CONFIDENTIAL RECORDS

Bass Pro Shop faces lawsuit over alligator meat purchases

The lawsuit comes from Big Pop's Fresh Louisiana Seafood, which alleges in a lawsuit filed last week that an agreement was reached between both parties for Bass Pro Shops to buy 600,000 lbs (272,155 kg) of alligator meat, beginning in 2016, reports KSDK.

The company alleges the Missouri-based Bass Pro committed a breach of contract when it bought only 283,432 lbs (128,562 kg) throughout the four-year contract — which is now expired, since July.

The lawsuit shows Big Pop suffering a loss of more than $75,000 during the contract period, which it says is why it wants damages from Bass Pro.

A Bass Pro spokesperson said the company never comments on litigation, according to the local news source. But as of writing, online court records suggest the case has already been assigned to the federal court's mediation program.

COVID-19 coronavirus causes sales to drop

To many readers, this entire ordeal probably feels unconscionably bizarre. Most people have never eaten an alligator, let alone ordered hundreds of thousands of pounds of alligator meat. However, in the south people don't just eat it. They go to court over disputes all the time, because just like other seafood industries, there's money in it.

And while we can't say for certain, the seafood industry is likely not alone in feeling the pressure to remain competitive amid the COVID-19 coronavirus. Numerous restaurants and retailers across the country have struggled to stay afloat amid the economic turmoil triggered amid social distancing measures enforced at will or by law in the U.S. — with many closing permanently. While we can't say for certain, it's likely a drop in alligator meat purchases happened because of a drop in consumer interest, as the job market faces increasingly difficult times.

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