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Climate Criminals: Thieves Steal 300,000 Liters of Water from Australian Drought-hit Area

A farmer in Evans Plains reported the water missing from two tanks on his property.

The recent heatwave in Australia has led to record-breaking temperatures and severe droughts, and proof of just how alarming the situation has become is the fact that people are actually starting to steal water.

An Australian newspaper reported the theft of 300,000 liters of water from one of the country's most drought-hit areas.

RELATED: AUSTRALIAN SCIENTISTS USE SATELLITES TO PREDICT DROUGHT 5 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

Water missing

New South Wales (NSW) Police revealed a farmer in Evans Plains reported the water missing from two tanks on his property on Sunday. Now, authorities are requesting any information that can lead to an arrest and hopefully the recuperation of the water.

It seems the theft of water, as unusual as it may sound, is becoming commonplace in climate change-ravaged Australia. A couple of weeks ago, 25,000 liters of water were stolen from a town in Murwillumbah.

In the meantime, just last week, the NSW authorities were considering evacuating up to 90 towns if the drought got bad enough. It seems the towns in that area have been relying on water trucked in for months now.

A state of emergency

Meanwhile, Australia's temperatures have been so high in the past few days that roads are literally melting. Last Tuesday, a seven-day state of emergency was declared in NSW due to the record-breaking heatwave.

 "The biggest concern over the next few days is the unpredictability, with extreme wind conditions [and] extremely hot temperatures," Premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters on Thursday.

The fear, of course, is for the bushfire crisis to get worse as fires have been tormenting Australia. The bushfires that have been raging for months have already killed six people and destroyed hundreds of homes.

The fires are fed by a combination of high temperatures and strong winds. As the country's situation worsens, we can't help but ask how bad do things have to get before politicians around the world take action?

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