Elon Musk’s battle against bots: ‘It’s a war and we are gonna win that war’

'1.1 million total listeners tuned in' during the 'Twitter Files' live coverage on Saturday.
Baba Tamim
Elon Musk speaks at the Tesla Giga Texas manufacturing "Cyber Rodeo" grand opening party on April 7, 2022 in Austin, Texas.
Elon Musk speaks at the Tesla Giga Texas manufacturing "Cyber Rodeo" grand opening party on April 7, 2022 in Austin, Texas.

SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP via Getty Images 

More than a million people tuned in to Twitter Spaces to hear the world's richest man speak while he was flying in his private jet on Saturday. 

During the live podcast hosted by some independent media and social personalities following the publication of the "Twitter Files" last week, Elon Musk was questioned by a sizable group of Blue tick holders about a variety of subjects pertaining to the social networking platform.

The tech billionaire was asked about his plan for handling the bots on Twitter 2.0, to which he responded. 

"I will defeat the bots," he said, "It's a war, and we are gonna win that war."

"We will expose those who want to manipulate people," he added. 

He explained that the bots were acting "in concert," but he intends to develop software that will allow him to control the bot influence.

"Those software tools haven't been written, but we will make them," he said.  

Elon Musk’s battle against bots: ‘It’s a war and we are gonna win that war’
More than a million people tuned in to Twitter Spaces to hear Musk speak.

To one of the questions asked about the re-introduction of blue check marks on Twitter which has been delayed by Twitter 2.0 twice, Musk stated that his team is "a week away to restart [the] verification process." 

The new CEO suggested that another verification process might be added to strengthen user credibility and combat bots. 

This verification process may include two-factor phone verification with a reliable carrier, ID verification similar to Airbnb, and organizational verification.

Bots make 50% of internet traffic worldwide

Automated bots have been on the list of to-do things for Twitter 2.0 from day one since Musk took over Twitter. 

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The platform has changed many regulations for weeks, including requesting that developers disclose any instances in which they are running a bot account.

Furthermore, bot accounts could have a different label to make users more aware of them. 

This update will give Twitter more possibilities to take action against accounts that abuse the rules, even if people abusing the technology are likely not to identify themselves.

These automated algorithms, among countless other nefarious activities, can quickly purchase concert tickets or pose as people on social media. 

According to various estimates, bad bots are a significant problem, making up anywhere between 25 percent and 50 percent of all internet traffic worldwide.

Musk has made many changes to Twitter since taking over in October, including promoting more "free speech." And this may have led to the release of "Twitter Files," according to Musk supporters. 

'Twitter Files'

New York Post's news report about Hunter Biden's laptop scandal prior to the 2020 presidential election was reportedly censored by the previous Twitter administration, which is apparently not acceptable to Musk.

The previous management may have concealed or repressed news of Hunter Biden's abandoned laptop issue, according to a series of tweets Musk wrote on Friday.

When asked about the "Twitter Files" on Saturday's Twitter Spaces live stream, Musk stated that he had given the detailed data to a few independent Journalists and that what he has read so far is "George Orwell would be turning in his grave kind of stuff."

"1.1 million total listeners tuned in live at some point" during the "Twitter Files" live coverage, and the "Cheif Twit" is expected to join more such spaces in the future.