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Designers Recreate Famous Movie Scenes to Fight Plastic Pollution

These Australian designers are trying to highlight the long-term environmental impacts of short-term actions.

A small plastic toy's short encounter with a kid who quickly gets bored of it produces a looming waste that will remain intact for many many years in the out of sight places of our planet. 

This problem doubles in size when faced with short-term promotions, much like those made by supermarket chains. In Alex Wadelton and Tom Whitty's case, the supermarkets in question were the Australian supermarket chains called Woolworths and Coles who are using small plastic toys to sell their products.

In order to raise awareness, Alex and Tom launched the "Future Landfill" project in 2019, highlighting the long-term environmental impact of these short-term promotions. After seeing Woolworths was back with another toy promotion featuring Disney's 'Ooshies', they decided to do what they do best and recreated the classic Disney movie posters and gave them a very plastic update.

SEE ALSO: HOW TO ELIMINATE PLASTIC WASTE AND PLASTIC POLLUTION WITH SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The posters were designed to have little plastic toys in the leading roles — of course, with a touch of humor in them. In one of these interpretations, Finding Nemo is rebranded as Choking Nemo. The poster is the perfect reminiscence of 2020: You can actually see a face mask floating around in the aquamarine waters with plastic Dory in tow.

Designers Recreate Famous Movie Scenes to Fight Plastic Pollution
Source: Future Landfill

Toy Story has become Destroy Story, and the "To infinity and beyond!" quote has never sounded grimmer.

Designers Recreate Famous Movie Scenes to Fight Plastic Pollution
Source: Future Landfill

Lady and the Tramp has become Landfill and the Trash. On a Bored Panda Post, Alex wrote: "There’s nothing romantic about a love affair with economic gain at the expense of environmental pain," and he is completely right.

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Designers Recreate Famous Movie Scenes to Fight Plastic Pollution
Source: Future Landfill

And finally, Frozen is reimagined as F***ed, perfectly summarizes the situation we are in with rising sea levels due to melting ice caps and the landfills we deposit in them with bullheadedly, showing absolutely no regard for our collective future

Designers Recreate Famous Movie Scenes to Fight Plastic Pollution
Source: Future Landfill

These reinterpretations hold importance in the way that they are encouraging Australians to sign a petition to stop supermarkets from making these "short-sighted plastic promotions" and get Woolworths to end the campaign and commit to recycling the toys. As of this writing, 14.277 people have already signed it. 

This project highlights our devastating waste management problems that usually go unnoticed, and highlights the importance of the circular economy

When the fact that LEGO bricks can survive for up to 1,300 years in the ocean is properly thought out, eliminating plastic pollution with the power of science and engineering gains immense importance — and in some cases, we can tackle such problems simply by not producing. 

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