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Engineers Finally Built the World's Tiniest Violin

Perfect for all of your whining friends.

Engineers Finally Built the World's Tiniest Violin

The world's smallest violin is a long-running comedy gag where rubbing one's fingers together produces a tiny violin noise showing sarcastic sympathy. With new technology from Google, it is now possible to play a violin with the tips of your fingers, bringing the comedy sketch into reality. Design I/O worked on all of the coding for the project to create a program that would trigger sad music whenever a finger rubbing motion is completed over a sensor pad. Check it out below.

Google's Project Soli was the basis for this project, a tiny radar-based chip sensor that can detect movement fairly accurately. This technology allowed the violin music to be precisely triggered when fingers are slowly rubbed together. While there really isn't a microscopic violin being played, it sure looks like it.

tiny violin
Source: Google Project Soli

The downside to this project is you probably can't take the tiny violin with you wherever you go, but I am sure you engineers could figure something out. Perhaps with future wearables, or even current technology, you could take the world's tiniest violin with you anywhere.

SEE ALSO: Project Bloks: Google’s Open Platform to Change Coding Forever

Think of how many times having the world tiniest violin would come in handy in daily life! Is your friend sad about something inconsequential? Just play the world's smallest violin to lighten the mood. Are you cursed with peculiarly small hands? Then this violin is perfect for small people with small hands. But after all, the best thing about the world's smallest violin is the accomplishment you get from playing it well. Playing a small violin is no easy feat after all. 

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In reality though, the tiny sensor used for this violin could be incredibly practical in many devices, even just as an external sensor for many diy projects. What do you think you could use it for?

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