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Evergreen Truck Goes Viral After Blocking Motorway Just Like the Ship

Although the coincidence is entertaining, the ship and the truck do not actually belong to the same firm.

Mere days after an Evergreen ship, called Ever Givengot lodged in the Suez Canal, images surfaced of a truck with the Evergreen logo in Nanjing, China, having crashed and ending up coming to a halt across the road’s multiple lanes. The date on the image is stamped at 9.55 AM local time and the accident took place on the Changchun-Shenzhen Expressway.

The similarities between the ship and the truck are astonishing. As Mothership pointed out, both the truck and ship veered off course to their right side and stopped at a roughly 45° angle. They also both blocked traffic from behind them with the ship stopping 260 ships from reaching their destination.

Before we get ahead of ourselves and draw any conclusions that Evergreen is a company that just attracts chaos, it should be noted that the Evergreen truck likely is not affiliated with Evergreen Marine Corporation. As the China Times reported Evergreen does not operate a trailer business in Mainland China, focusing solely on transportation by sea. 

Luckily, it should be much easier to dislodge the truck than it is the ship. The Evergreen ship is more than 1,300 ft (roughly 396 m) long and ran aground after 40-knot winds and a sandstorm reduced visibility and the ship's capacity to navigate. A March 24 statement on Evergreen Marine Corp's website stated the firm is working closely with the Suez Canal Authority "to refloat the stranded ship as soon as possible."

The Suez Canal is a key shortcut for worldwide commerce in Egypt, enabling direct transportation between Europe's Mediterranean Sea and Asia via the Red Sea. Centuries ago, navigators exploring or shipping goods were forced to travel around the southern coast of Africa which severely extended their travel times. When the Suez Canal was formally opened in 1869 A.D., it reduced the travel distances by 43%.

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