For the First Time Ever, Majority of MIT Engineering Department Heads Are Women

Five out of eight of the heads of the engineering departments at MIT are now women.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the first time ever, has appointed five women as the heads of different sectors of its engineering department. There are eight heads of department in total, making the women the clear majority.

Women in engineering are still the exception instead of the norm, which is part of what makes this news so exciting. 

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Who are the women?

These women are some powerful role models, leading world-renowned research in a top tier university. They are impressive, to say the least, and it's fantastic to see more women leading the engineering path, a predominantly male-oriented industry so far. 

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For the First Time Ever, Majority of MIT Engineering Department Heads Are Women
The women leading MIT Engineering departments. Source: MIT

From left to right, here's an introduction to these women:

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Asu Ozdalgar, head of MITEECS or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

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Ozdalgar's research focuses primarily on issues that appear in large-scale network systems such as communication networks, transportation networks, as well as social and economic ones. 

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Paula Hammond, head of MITChemE or Chemical Engineering.

Hammond believes that "By understanding how and why molecules assemble, flow, move, and react together, it is possible to create, design and control a world of things." 

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Anne White, head of Nuclear Science and Engineering.

White's expertise lies in fusion energy and turbulence modeling.

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Angela Belcher, head of MITDeptofBE or the Department of Biological Engineering. 

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Belcher's research focuses mostly on biomaterials, organic-inorganic interface engineering, and synthetic biology. 

And last but certainly not least, Evelyn Wang, head of MITMechE or Mechanical Engineering.

Wang's primary interests lie in water harvesting, purification and conservation, as well as thermal management, energy conversion, and storage. 

Good news well received

As we can see from MIT's Twitter post last week, the news has been well received by many, with many retweeting and liking the tweet: 

MIT and many people around the world are thrilled at the diversity and appointment of these phenomenal people, not merely for the fact that they are women, but for what they have achieved as researchers and professors.

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