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Headless Robot Servant Can Stack, Carry Boxes, Will Sell for $250,000

A headless robot called Digit can carry boxes up the stairs, automating workplaces for $250,000.

A robot manufacturer called Agility built a bipedal humanoid robot called Digit — capable of loading boxes onto trucks — and it's selling for a whopping $250,000, according to a quote obtained from the company's website.

Digit the headless robot is shipping now.

RELATED: RISE OF THE MACHINES: ONE OF THESE ADVANCED ROBOTS MAY SOON TAKE OVER THE WORLD

Headless robot servant sells for $250,000, shipping now

The company also announced a $20 million investment round, which has given it the financial means to go into "full commercial production," reports Futurism.

As a bipedal robot, the machine has a familiar shape: with two legs and two arms. But it's headless demeanor (literally), along with backward-bending knees guarantee no one could mistake this product for a human being.

Digit was designed to carry out labor-intensive duties, including loading and unloading hefty cargo, or performing an inspection of potentially hazardous workplaces. But unlike wage workers, this servant robot can be packed into a rolling suitcase for optimal delivery and mobility.

"If robots are going to be effective and useful to us they're going to have to work on our terms in our space," argued Agility CEO Jonathan Hurst in a video.

Bipedal robots lift, carry boxes up stairways

Digit has no toes, and its feet are flat. It has no hands, and no head. But it makes up for lack of character in strength and durability — along with a computer capable of executing tasks autonomously and without an unwieldy tether, reports TechXplore.

The robot's frame is thick metal, and it moves efficiently — mimicking the motion of a person performing manual labor. Digit can bend over to lift boxes, and then carry them to the desired end-point — including up a stairway — to leave the box where it's needed.

While we're still a long way from an AI-enabled robot addition to the household, automated robots are sweeping through the industrial sector — from Tesla's dreadnought to the emergency medical service optimization — so we should prepare for the day when an army of bipedal robots takes on more labor than any human workforce ever could.

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