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Japanese Town Sets Monster Wolf Robot to Keep Bears Away

With the protection of these creepy robots, this town will sure be at peace.

Would you be scared if you came face to face with a howling red-eyed creature on your way to getting some food? Well, that's what local government officials in a Japanese town called Takikawa wanted to do to prevent wild bears from attacking residential areas. Surely, the aim is to make it happen without harming any animals in the process. 

So the officials came up with this mechanical Monster Wolf idea, presented by Ohta Seiki, a mechanical part manufacture company. It is kind of scary for the average human too, we must say.  

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The moment this mechanical monster detects an animal, a bear coming closer, it emits a loud, spooky sound and his eyes light up red. If that doesn't sound scary enough for you, here is the footage below. 

That's not the only sound this monster wolf can make. It has 60 different options involving wolf howls, human voices, and even the sound of gunshots. The point is simply to have the bears not get used to the robot to keep them scared off of many sounds. 

Bears in Japan's Takikawa region have this urge of scavenging for food in the fall season and store it for a long winter to hibernate. And they choose to hunt some food near humans, as we are just occupying their natural places while we modernize our life standards. So, this sounds quite fair for bears to search for some food where they belonged in the first place.

Japanese Town Sets Monster Wolf Robot to Keep Bears Away
Source: coccochan0213/Twitter

Currently, monster wolves are placed in 62 communities across the country, per SoraNews24. And the recent addition to the aforementioned town seems to have solved the issue as no bears showed up in the neighborhood since the installation was there. 

“We have included many methods in its design to drive off bears, so I am confident it will be effective,” Ohta Seiki's president Yuji Ohta indicated. “If this can help create an environment that bears and people can both live in, I will be happy.”

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