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NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit

Yesterday, Mercury passed across the Sun and millions of earthbound viewers watched the phenomenon from almost anywhere in the world.

NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit
Mercury passing across the Sun's surfaceNASA

It is not always that we are reminded of our insignificance in the universe so bluntly. And such events as this, never fail to thrill us. NASA released fascinating images of Mercury making a rare transit across the Sun’s face, which happens only 13 times in a century. 

RELATED: MERCURY WILL TRANSIT THE SUN TODAY AND YOU SHOULDN’T MISS IT

During this 2019 transit, Mercury spent 5.5 hours moving in front of the Sun from our perspective on Earth. Skywatchers from all over the world could see some part of Mercury's movements across the Sun, but only with telescopes or solar-filtered binoculars.

Several spacecraft, along with NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), watched the event from space.

NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit
AIA 193, Source: NASA 

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) enables us to see the solar chromosphere and corona in seven extreme ultraviolet channels with the help of continuous full-disk observations.

NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit
AIA 131, Source: NASA

The high-definition photographs show the tiny planet Mercury diving past the solar wing and crossing the Sun’s face.

NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit
AIA 211, Source: NASA

SDO took images in different wavelengths, including extreme ultraviolet that reveals the Sun’s surface with blazing magnetic field lines.

NASA Releases Stunning Images of Mercury Transit
AIA HMI I No LD, Source: NASA

You can watch the full transit from here.

Skywatchers from all around the world took images of the event too.

People were out in the fields, wishing for a cloudless sky and trying to get a glimpse of Mercury, as it appeared on the surface of the Sun as a tiny dot. 

And this user had something humorous to say! 

Humans were not the only ones who enjoyed the phenomenon.

There are other stars out there that make our gigantic Sun look like Mercury. Don’t you feel small yet? 

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