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Penguins Waddle Free and Visit Animal Pals after Coronavirus Leaves Aquarium Deserted

These little penguins got a taste of what it's like to be on the other side of the glass, and they seem to like it.

Penguins Waddle Free and Visit Animal Pals after Coronavirus Leaves Aquarium Deserted
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Remember Madagascar? The animals in that movie would wander across the zoo after it was closed. That scene came to life at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium after much of the world headed into lockdown amid the coronavirus pandemic.

These little penguins were allowed on a small “field trip” that enabled them to explore the rest of the aquarium and get a taste of what it’s like on the other side of the glass.

The aquarium had announced in a statement released on its website that it was planning to close its doors to the public until 29 March “in the best interest of overall wellness for our community and for each other.”

As you’d imagine, this left a huge room for the caretakers to get creative in how they provided enrichment to animals.

SEE ALSO: 13 ANIMALS GIVEN A NEW LEASE IN LIFE WITH PROSTHETICS

The aquarium told the Chicago Tribune, “The caretakers are introducing new experiences, activities, foods, and more to keep them active, encourage them to explore, problem-solve, and express natural behaviors.”

 The aquarium shared the adorable videos of some penguins enjoying a tour of their own and getting a chance to stretch out their legs.

One of the penguins, named Wellington, met some fish in the Amazon Exhibit, and probably, the fish were lucky that this encounter happened with a glass wall in between them.

Afterwards, the adventure continued, and the nesting buddies Edward and Annie explored the aquarium’s rotunda.

While they are a bonded pair who never leave each other's side, we should remind you that you should practice social distancing at all instances and don't act like penguins.

Look at them waddle around to get that sweet Information.

These videos remind us of the uplifting power of clueless animals. Watching them waddle around and probably whispering “Smile and wave, boys” to each other has cheered up thousands of viewers, especially important at a time where anxiety and fear are widespread.

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