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Researchers Say That We Are Unprepared for Drones Being Used in Terror Attacks

The research points towards us not being ready for such a drone attack.

Drones are used in many different fun ways nowadays, from snapping videos from above to racing each other. However, sometimes they're also used in more serious scenarios, such as during terrorist attacks or to spy on people. 

Researchers have looked into radar technology to see whether we can prevent the latter use of drones. 

A new study on the matter was published in IEEE on Wednesday 11 March.

SEE ALSO: U.S. INTERIOR DEPARTMENT RESTRICTS USE OF CHINESE-MADE DRONES

How to effectively monitor drones

Researchers from Aalto University in Finland, UCLouvain in Belgium, and New York University have collected data from radar measurement that specifically looked at how drone detection technology could be improved.

Vasilii Semkin, a research scientist and one of the study's authors stated that the team looked at the differences in various drone models to notice if different drones reflect diverse radio waves. 

"We measured drones' RCS at multiple 26-40 GHz millimeter-wave frequencies to better understand how drones can be detected, and to investigate the difference between drone models and materials in terms of scattering radio signals," Semkin said.

"We believe that our results will be a starting point for a future uniform drone database. Therefore, all results are publicly available along with our research paper."

Semkin also stressed the importance of their research as there is a pressing need to improve the way drones are currently monitored, so as to stop any potential threats to the public's safety. 

It's easy to see how drones could be used to spy on people, all you have to do is attach a camera atop it and fly it nearby. Moreover, even more concerningly, drones could be used for much more nefarious purposes, such as strapping a bomb onto one and flying it into a crowd of people. 

The reason why this study is so important is that these findings could be invaluable for preventing any of these nefarious uses of drones. 

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