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"Ring Of Fire" Solar Eclipse is the Gift of Cosmos for Christmas

Watch the last eclipse of 2019 this holiday season.

What a magical time Christmas is! Space now has a gift for us; the last solar eclipse of 2019. Solar eclipse, also known as "ring of fire" eclipse will occur on Thursday, December 26, at 8:17 a.m. GMT+3.

The "ring of fire" will be visible from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, India, Sumatra, Borneo, Guam, and the Philippines. People in other parts of Asia, Australia, and Africa will be able to see a part of the eclipse. 

The reason why it's called "ring of fire" is that the eclipse will occur a couple of days after the moon reaches apogee, which is the farthest distance of the moon from Earth, and the size of the moon in the sky will be smaller than the sun. Thus, it won't block the sun entirely, instead, it will block a big part of it and the parts that aren't blocked will look like a "ring of fire." 

"Ring Of Fire" Solar Eclipse is the Gift of Cosmos for Christmas
Source: teekid/iStock

Solar Eclipse will be visible from Hofuf, Saudi Arabia, it'll last for 2 minutes and 55 seconds, the partial eclipse will begin before sunrise and the annular will begin at 6:34 a.m. 

It'll also be visible from Mangalore, India, it will last for 1 minute and 49 seconds, and the partial eclipse will begin at 8:04 a.m. and the annular will begin at 9:24 a.m.

Another place that the eclipse will be visible is Jaffna, Sri Lanka, it'll last for 3 minutes and 8 seconds, the partial eclipse will begin at 8:09 a.m. and the annular eclipse will begin 9:33 a.m.

Singapore will also be able to watch the Eclipse for 1 minute and 58 seconds. The partial eclipse will begin at 11:27 a.m. and the annular eclipse will begin at 1:22 p.m.

In Sarangani, Philippines, the Eclipse will be visible for 2 minutes 25 seconds, and the partial eclipse will begin at 12:44 p.m. and the annular eclipse will begin at 2:29 p.m.

Guam will be the last place on Earth to see the eclipse for 3 minutes 4 seconds. The partial eclipse will begin at 3:33 p.m. and the annual eclipse will begin at 4:54 p.m.

For those who live in the parts of the world where they can't watch the eclipse, here's a link to watch it online.

Don't forget to use eye protection if you're looking directly at the sun! 

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