Covid-19
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Russia Registers COVID-19 Vaccine, Putin's Daughter Already Given a Shot

Russia registered the vaccine before completing Phase 3 trials.

Russia Registers COVID-19 Vaccine, Putin's Daughter Already Given a Shot
Coronavirus vaccineSimon2579/iStock

Pharma companies around the world are working around the clock in order to come up with a COVID-19 vaccine. Many have already begun trials and are even moving to Phase 3 trials, which usually require months of testing on thousands of healthy volunteers. 

As of Tuesday, Russia has officially registered its coronavirus vaccine, giving it the green light to be administered to many of the nation's people. 

Russia has supposedly dubbed the vaccine "Sputnik" after the Soviet satellite, as per AFP.

SEE ALSO: BIONTECH AND PFIZER'S COVID-19 VACCINE SHOWS POSITIVE RESULTS

Putin's daughter has already received a shot

According to AP, Russia's President Vladimir Putin spoke at a government meeting on Tuesday explaining that the country's vaccine against the coronavirus has already proven enough positive results, and offers a lasting immunity against the virus. 

By registering the vaccine as ready to be used, Russia lived up to its recent promise of "beating the West" to create a coronavirus vaccine. Initially, the country was aiming for a September launch date, but it's looking like it's ready almost three weeks ahead of time.

As per Putin, the vaccine went through proper testing, and mentioned that one of his two daughters has received the vaccine and is feeling fine. 

The drug is developed by Moscow's Gamaleya Institute and the Russian Direct Investment Fund, as per the Japan Times.

As per AP's report, the Russian authorities will prioritize medical workers, teachers, and other high-risk groups to receive the vaccine first. 

This news makes Russia the first country to register a vaccine against the coronavirus. However, there are those who are skeptical about the news given the vaccine hasn't yet undergone the typical Phase 3 trials, which usually take months and thousands of participants to complete. 

Concerns have also been raised about the speed of Russia's vaccine, wondering whether this is too closely linked to a victory in the vaccine race, cutting corners rather than focusing on the actual proper science behind it, reports the Los Angeles Times.

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