Southern California Hit by 6.4 Magnitude Earthquake, 50% Chance of Another Large Quake

Seismologists are reporting on the aftershocks of the California quake, saying more are likely to come.

Southern California experienced a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on Thursday. The earthquake hit a remote area between Los Angeles and Las Vegas and is the strongest earthquake to hit the area in two decades, the United States Geological Survey reports.

The epicenter of the tremor was near the city of Ridgecrest, located roughly 150 miles (240 km) north-east of Los Angeles. 

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Situation under control

The earthquake was felt as far away as Las Vegas in Nevada, the BBC reports. While there was significant damage in Ridgecrest, the epicenter of the earthquake was fortunately located in a fairly remote location away from population centers, local geophysicist Professor John Rundle explained to the BBC.

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Rep. Kevin Mcarthy provided an update after the earthquake and thanked first responders.

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Donal Trump also tweeted after the tremor, saying that everything was under control.

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Images were shared online in the aftermath of the earthquake, shortly after it happened.

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Another large quake likely

The latest update from CNN, as of writing, is that the area will continue to experience aftershocks.

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Seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones told CNN that at least 159 aftershocks have been recorded since the quake, and there is a 50% chance of another large earthquake in the next week.

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Southern California Hit by 6.4 Magnitude Earthquake, 50% Chance of Another Large Quake
The San Andreas Fault, California. Source: USGS

The earthquake has left scattered damage throughout the Ridgecrest area. Footage from the location showed firefighters trying to put fires under control. A bomb testing facility, China Lake, reported some hazardous material had been leaked following the earthquake.

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