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Tesla Model X Cut in Half in Accident with Nissan GT-R While Driver Walks Away Untouched

A serious car crash in Florida has people on social media commenting left, right, and center.

Tesla Model X Cut in Half in Accident with Nissan GT-R While Driver Walks Away Untouched
The Tesla cut in half1, 2

A shocking crash in Florida between a Nissan GT-R and a Tesla Model X left the Tesla completely cut in half, and the front of the Nissan smashed in. 

Luckily both drivers and car occupants aren't in critical condition, and in fact, the Tesla owner only had a little blood running out of his nose and a minor leg injury. The Nissan's occupants were brought to the hospital. 

Allegedly the Nissan ran a red light as it sped right into the Tesla. 

RELATED: TESLA MODEL 3 AND THE NETHERLANDS SET ANOTHER RECORD TOGETHER

How fast was the Nissan going to split the Tesla in half?

Many people have been commenting on Reddit and Twitter, wondering just how quickly the Nissan GT-R must have been rolling to cut the all-electric Tesla in two halves. 

Among those comments are some incredulous ones wondering how badly built a Tesla must be if it can split in half. However, as per the Twitter post below, the EV is in fact built that way so as to minimize the impact on the oncoming car. 

It's always unfortunate to read about car crashes such as this one, however, this one has highlighted Tesla's award-winning safety features. It's quite common to see SUVs rollover when a side impact happens as they have a high center of gravity. Teslas, however, including the Model X, have a very low-lying center of gravity, which means they virtually never roll over in high-speed accidents. 

Furthermore, the car has an outer casing battery pack which serves as an extra layer of structural rigidity, it also has a hybrid of ultra-high-strength materials, as well as big crumple zones that absorb shock.

Even though the car split in half, it was built for as much safety as possible, and we're glad the crash wasn't more serious.

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