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The Earth Has Just Seen Its Hottest Temperature Since 1931

The hottest temperatures usually happen in July but seems like August takes the lead this year.

Last year, the Northern Hemisphere experienced a number of heatwaves. From Europe to the U.S., a large number of people endured uncomfortably high temperatures. 

So far this year, it's not been quite the same experience. Until now. 

As per the Weather Service in the U.S., Western parts of the country, notably Death Valley in California (the name says it all), experienced some of their highest recorded temperatures this August, and the month isn't over yet. 

August setting a new heat trend

Death Valley's temperatures reached up to 130 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degrees Celcius) on Sunday, as the Weather Service's tweet. This would make it potentially a record high since 1913, the last time such temperatures were recorded to reach that height in August in the region. 

Usually, July takes the ticket for the hottest month of the year, but it seems that August will be the winner this year. 

SEE ALSO: JULY WAS THE HOTTEST MONTH EVER RECORDED ON EARTH

As per Randy Cerveny, the head of the World Meteorological Organization’s weather and climate extremes team, who told the Washington Post, "Everything I’ve seen so far indicates that is a legitimate observation."

"I am recommending that the World Meteorological Organization preliminarily accept the observation. In the upcoming weeks, we will, of course, be examining it in detail, along with the U.S. National Climate Extremes Committee, using one of our international evaluation teams," he explained. 

And if Sunday's Death Valley temperature is confirmed, it would make it the highest number officially recorded since 1931, and the third-highest since 1873, as per the Washington Post's report.

Given its name and location, Death Valley wouldn't be a surprising spot to break such a record. It is the lowest, driest, and hottest area in the United States and is known for reaching temperatures in the 100s. 

It's been a hot August in most of the western U.S., so making sure to stay cool and hydrated is key.

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