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US Government Plans 'Unhackable Internet' Using National Quantum Technology

The US Department of Energy has unveiled its plans to develop a national quantum network.

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has unveiled its plans to develop a parallel national quantum network that is super-fast and unhackable and could be used by sensitive government departments and banks to send information, according to the Department of Energy. The blueprint of the network was revealed in an event at the University of Chicago on Thursday.  

The department detailed four research areas that need to be given priority for the technology to achieve completion and stated it could be functional in a decade.

SEE ALSO: MIND-MELTING IDEAS OFFERED BY QUANTUM PHYSICS

Back in February, DOE National Laboratories, universities, and industry had met in NYC to develop the blueprint strategy, and now that report has been made public, describing the engineering and design barriers and laying out the essential research that is needed.

Priorities were detected

Providing the foundational building blocks for Quantum Internet; Integrating Quantum networking devices; Creating repeating, switching, and routing technologies for Quantum entanglement; and enabling error correction of Quantum networking function are the research areas that the report states that should be made a priority.

U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette said, "The Department of Energy is proud to play an instrumental role in the development of the national quantum internet. By constructing this new and emerging technology, the United States continues with its commitment to maintain and expand our quantum capabilities."

A step forward in the global quantum race

DOE’s 17 National Laboratories will be working on the quantum internet, and as the name suggests, they'll be relying on quantum mechanics to "control and transmit information more securely than ever before."

The United States will be on with the global quantum race that will usher a new era of communications -- and some developments are already in the works.

Photons have already been entangled by Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago after setting up a "quantum loop" test bed. Reportedly, a third node is in the plans and will be added at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

The full blueprint was published online.

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