US Investigation of Boeing 737 Max Has Now Expanded to the 787 Dreamliner

The new set of subpoenas focus on a Boeing South Carolina plant responsible for the manufacturing of the 787 Dreamliner.

Since the two fatal crashes of the Boeing 737 Max, the company’s best selling jet, the United States Government has been looking into the software and design of the plane. Both are said to be responsible for the plane’s failings. 

The 737 Max investigation and the newly expanded investigation into the 787 factory aims to quail and further understand what caused the crash and if there Boeing has cut corners on another popular plane. 

An Investigative Look Into Boeing

The Justice investigation, reported by the Seattle Times takes a further look into the manufacturing of the 787 Dreamliner at a new Boeing plant in North Charleston. Allegedly, there have been reports of misconduct at the Boeing factory with warnings of tools and other debris left inside jets. Even more so there has been the consistent talk of a culture of intimidation at the non-union plant. 

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Though the expansion of the probe comes as a surprise, it should be mentioned that Boeing has not been accused of any wrongdoing. 

Even more so, Boeing’s Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg said in a press conference earlier this month that the company would cooperate with all government inquiries 

A Continued Look at 737 Max

Both the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Transportation Department and the Justice Department are involved in the grounded 737 Max jetliners investigation

The SEC is currently looking at whether Boeing properly disclosed issues tied to the 737 Max jetliners. The 737 debacle looks like it will continue to spawn a host of other investigations. 

Even earlier this week, Boeing was met with more bad news when the FAA revealed that it had found another safety risk regarding a microprocessor in the 737 Max’s flight control computer

Boeing is currently working on a software patch and is completely redesigning the system linked to the crashes. Until then, the 737 Max is grounded.

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