Here's Why the Headquarters of the US Department of Defense Is Shaped Like a Pentagon

The 32nd U.S. president may also have something to do with it.

Unlike many other regular and plain state department buildings in the country, the internationally recognized symbol for the U.S. military, the Pentagon, is actually shaped like a pentagon for not just one, but few reasons. 

General Brehon Somervell, who was responsible for the army's logistics back then, wanted to build a new headquarter for the War Department that included 40,000 people, what is now the Department of Defense, instead of a couple of buildings spread over the National Mall. The first draft of the building revealed a shape of a pentagon, so that it could fit just right in between the landscape. However, a group of preservationists objected to the idea as the new building was to block the view of the Arlington National Cemetery. So the building was moved down to where it was today, but they kept the pentagon shape as it was, thanks to the fact that Franklin Roosevelt liked it that way, and thought that it was unique.

Of course, this is not the only reason why the grand headquarters building of the US Defense Department is shaped like a pentagon. Between 1941 and 1943, it took 110 architects, 54 structural engineers, 43 mechanical engineers, and 3,100 architectural drawings to come up with a gigantesque yet efficient structure. For more details about the possible reasons why it became a beautiful work of architecture, make sure to watch the video above. 

Follow Us on

GET YOUR DAILY NEWS DIRECTLY IN YOUR INBOX

Stay ahead with the latest science, technology and innovation news, for free:

By subscribing, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe at any time.