This Helicopter Shreds a Building into Pieces as It Tries to Land


0 shares

A helicopter is sort of the epitome of cool. Remember that copter chase in Spectre?

But that sort of diminishes - a lot - when you can’t park the thing. Which is exactly what happened to a RedBull AH1-Cobra when it landed at an Austrian airport. The helicopter comes in sideways to the airstrip at a devastatingly tense pace. And just when you think it is going to touch down, it comes just a little bit closer and...the blades start to tear the building to shreds. Check the video below for all the building grating action. The video gets a little shaky at the end as the filmmaker runs for their life!

The helicopter comes in sideways to the airstrip at a devastatingly tense pace. And just when you think it is going to touch down, it comes just a little bit closer and...the blades start to tear the building to shreds. Check the video for all the building grating action. The video gets a little shaky at the end as the filmmaker runs for their life!

Chopper blades are no joke, being constructed from various materials generally aluminum, composite structure, and steel or titanium, and they can spin at up to speeds of 300rpm.

But if you want to know how deadly blades can be, just ask Jack Newton. The Australian golfer walked into the moving blades of a Cessna airplane in 1983. He lost his right eye and arm and was given a 50-50 chance of survival. Miraculously he pulled through and taught himself to play golf again.

The chopper featured in the video is a  RedBull AH1-Cobra. The former U.S Army attack helicopters. The helicopters make up a fleet of planes run by the ‘The Flying Bulls’. Who according to the RedBull website are “bunch of aviation enthusiasts with a great passion for rare historical airplanes and helicopters. And they are lots more besides. Not only do they watch over the most beautiful and exceptional fleet of planes in the world, they have played a significant role in the creation of Hangar‑7.”

If only they could park better.

Via Johannes Menhard

Stay on top of the latest
engineering news

Just enter your email and we’ll take care of the rest: