INDUSTRY / ELECTRONICS

This Video Will Show You How Your TV Functions in Slow Motion

Gav from YouTube's the Slow Mo Guys uses high-resolution imaging to show how two very iconic types of TVs work.


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By the end of the early 2000s, most people had a decent understanding of how their older boxy TV units worked. But what about if you have one of those incredibly nice, thin LCD TVs? What if you've got a big-screen TV?

Leave it to one of YouTube's most inquisitive channels to answer those questions. The Slow Mo Guys took their most recent video to figure out how most modern televisions work and capture the whole thing in incredible slow motion. 

For those familiar with the channel, be advised that it's just Gav for this vid -- in his living room with his own personal 85" LCD TV. But before diving into how modern TVs work, Gav pulled out a much older model that used a cathode-ray tube to fire electrons in Red Green Blue (RGB) lines at close enough speeds where they rendered full images. Those TVs are basically a series of lines quickly running from the top of a TV screen to the bottom. If you've ever used a cathode-ray TV (on of those big boxy ones of the late 1980s and early 1990s especially), you've probably experienced what happens to the picture when you hit the TV or somehow shake the cathode-ray tube. The picture goes a little wonky for a split second before restoring itself. To catch the details, Gav slowed down the camera to 28,500 FPS. It definitely gives you an appreciation for the TVs of your childhood. 

But what about those sleek modern ones like Gav had at the start of the video? Gav zooms the camera into the sub-pixel level, where each pixel has three smaller RGB pixels. The panels are lit by CCFLs (cold color fluorescent lights), which make the pictures on LCD TVs exceptionally bright. 

So the next time you binge-watch "Friends" on Netflix, appreciate the pixels working in perfect harmony to bring your show to life. 

This Video Will Show You How Your TV Functions in Slow Motion

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