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Watch Rivian R1T Wade Through 3-Foot-Deep Water in Trial

Could Tesla's 'boat mode' have finally found its match?

Watch Rivian R1T Wade Through 3-Foot-Deep Water in Trial
Rivian R1T wading through water during trial. RJ Scaringe/Twitter

We have brought you multiple videos of Tesla cars in 'boat mode' wading through flooded streets across different parts of the world. Electric SUV maker, Rivian, seems to have an unofficial 'boat mode' as well, judging from a reasonably well performance in a recent test run. A video of the test was shared on Twitter by Rivian CEO, RJ Scaringe. 

Founded in 2009, Rivian is building all-electric sports utility vehicles (SUVs) and pick-up trucks on a skateboard platform. Although mass-produced, electric vehicles are still made at low volumes and the skateboard chassis design allows the manufacturer to reduce costs of production. By placing all the major components on a single platform, car manufacturers can roll out different models with the bodies on top while scaling the chassis accordingly. 

Using this concept and the $700 million investment from Amazon, Rivian has designed a pick-up truck, R1T, and an SUV, R1S. After some delays, the company is very close to begin deliveries for the R1T in the next few days. The floodwater test video will definitely instill some confidence in the people who have patiently waited for their deliveries. 

As seen in the video, the water easily reaches up to the headlights of the pickup. While the video does not mention the depth of the test, it is approximately about three feet deep (1 meter), near the claim the company makes about the car's water wading capacities. The passengers in the car do seem a bit concerned about something as the car moves through. However, unlike gas-powered cars that would've been stuck, the electric vehicle moves through the water unhindered. 

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Once on the road, we are likely to see more instances of the R1T going through deep waters. The Tesla cars are meant for family use and that does not stop people from pushing through flooded streets. When you market a car, as  "built for whatever you call a road," you will see people taking "wild adventures" on this pickup that has a 300-mile (483 km) range. Deliveries of SUVs are expected to begin early next year, according to the company website.  

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