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Woman Falls Out of Moving Car and Onto Motorway All For a Snapchat Video

Luckily, neither she nor other drivers on the M25 motorway were seriously injured.

Driving fast on motorways can get dangerous at times if you're not paying attention. Last Saturday at 1:30 AM British Summer Time (BST), a woman fell out of a car window while the vehicle was driving on a busy motorway in the U.K.

How did such an event occur? She was trying to capture a Snapchat video out of the moving car, as per the Guardian's report.

This event highlights the dangers of not paying attention while in a moving vehicle, especially given the fact it was on the M25, one of the main motorways in the U.K.

SEE ALSO: 'FLYING' PLASTIC BOTTLE PULLED BEHIND MOVING TRUCK WITH AERODYNAMIC DRAG

All in the name of a video

The Surrey Police, who were called to the scene, mentioned on their Twitter account that the woman was leaning out of the car window to snap her video before she fell out of it, directly onto the motorway's roads.

The Police also stated that she was checked for any injuries by paramedics, and luckily she wasn't found to have been seriously hurt. Perhaps excluding her pride. 

The Police's tweet depicted a picture of the car window in question, along with the hashtag #nowords. 

It appears the woman wasn't arrested, which has surprised and even angered some Twitter users given the possible consequences of the situation. One Twitter user said "No arrests! How about wasting police time, causing danger to road users - Road Traffic Act 1988. Small beer perhaps but people need to [sic] me made aware of the consequences of their actions."

It's not the first time an accident linked to taking a video or a selfie puts people's lives in danger — not only those around the person in question but also the one snapping the image. As was first disclosed in CNN, a study published in the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care pointed out that 259 people died around the world trying to take selfies between 2011 and 2017. 

These are worrying numbers, however, selfies have also proven to potentially be useful and save lives by monitoring heart disease.

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