Advertisement

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway

It is claimed that the concept will have a range of 1,200 nautical miles (2,222 km).

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
The Pegasus The Goliath Series

Though there are plenty of impressive solar yacht concepts out there, we're likely a long way from seeing sustainable luxury leisure boating. Not so for sustainable eVTOL transport which promises to take flight in the coming years.

Perhaps that's why the Goliath Series, known for its yacht designs, has just unveiled a new design concept for an electric aircraft.

The benefits of both vertical and conventional takeoffs

The Pegasus aircraft offers "a much wider range of destinations" the company behind the Steve Kozloff-designed concept explains. This is because the 4-seater eVTOL aircraft is designed to take off and land vertically as well as on a runway, and it can shift between the two options depending on the requirements. 

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
Source: The Goliath Series

When it does have to land on a runway the Pegasus has a "very short field capability," the Goliath Series explains. The company says that the aircraft's two 132" propellers provide 7,500 lbs of thrust and 1 g+ of acceleration, allowing it to reach flight speed within 5 seconds and using only 400 ft (120 meters) of the runway. For landing, the propellers can reverse in order to also enable a shorter landing.  

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
Source: The Goliath Series

The company explains that though vertical takeoff will often be the preferred option, some situations might call for runway landings. For example, on dusty or snow-covered fields a vertical landing or takeoff could disrupt nearby aircraft or settlements by raising a large cloud of materials into the air.

Flying taxi industry on the verge of takeoff

The Pegasus aircraft uses a single pt6a67r turbine to power an engine, which then powers a generator that sends power to the aircraft's two electric motors on its wings. The system does away with any need for a combining transmission, drive shafts, or rotor transmissions. The Goliath Series claims its concept will have a range of 1,200 nautical miles (2,222 km).

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
Source: The Goliath Series

While the design is undeniably impressive, it doesn't have the same level of built-in redundancy seen in other models — a feature that will no doubt help to ease the transition to mass eVTOL transit for many over the coming years. German startup Lilium, for example, has built an eVTOL aircraft with 36 independent engines, meaning it is more than covered in the event of an engine failure. 

Advertisement
Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
Source: The Goliath Series

Still, it's worth emphasizing that the Pegasus aircraft is very much in the concept stage — the company is yet to choose the exact electric motor it will use for its aircraft — and there will likely be changes before we see the finalized model. 

Yacht Designer's New eVTOL Concept Can Land Vertically or Using a Runway
Source: The Goliath Series

Flying taxis and eVTOL aircraft promise to massively disrupt the transportation space — the air taxi market is expected to grow to $14.7 billion by 2041, according to IDTechEx. One company, Volocopter, recently conducted a 4-minute test flight at 164 ft, and it aims to kickstart its services by 2024 in Paris and Singapore. A large list of other companies is also aiming for similar goals, meaning that the second half of this decade may go down as the era of the flying taxi.

Follow Us on

Stay on top of the latest engineering news

Just enter your email and we’ll take care of the rest:

By subscribing, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe at any time.